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Guest Carbon

Advanced Surfacing For Solidworks?

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Guest Carbon

Hi!

 

What kind of learning materials would you recommend to somebody who is at the intermediate to advanced level using SolidWorks?

 

I'm thinking in the lines of advanced surfacing and also general workflow tips and tutorials to streamline the modeling process.

 

Also perhaps mold making for plastics - ie not theoretical, but practical stuff.

 

 

Any good books or DVD-s out there that go beyond the basics?

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Search for "DiMonte group" They have a lot of ppt presentations that go over advanced tactics and advice for quality solidworks surfacing. The presentations I saw are on older versions, but the core concepts are there.

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Guest Carbon
Your VAR should be running a comprehensive 1 or 2 day advance surfacing class.

 

VAR = value-added reseller, right?

 

I've been to the reseller classes, these have included only basic surfacing though.

 

 

To skinny:

Yeah, I've studied the DiMonte presentations and SW files.

 

 

To Kevin:

Thanks for the book link.

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Guest Carbon

So, are there more SW advanced surfacing learning materials out there, that are comparable to the Matt Lombard and DiMonte ones?

 

I'm thinking of pulling the trigger on the Matt Lombard "SolidWorks Surfacing and Complex Shape Modeling Bible".

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Guest kaiza

Carbon, what exactly is it that you want to learn? While this stuff will all be helpful, in the end most of your experience will come from actual modelling experience (and asking questions). Class A surfacing is beyond SW so would not be covered in any SW training material.

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Guest Carbon
Carbon, what exactly is it that you want to learn? While this stuff will all be helpful, in the end most of your experience will come from actual modelling experience (and asking questions). Class A surfacing is beyond SW so would not be covered in any SW training material.

 

Well, not exactly sure myself.

I've been doing the modeling/teaching mainly for school with SW for a while (since 2004) and with other software before that (Inventor, 3DSMax).

 

I think I'm looking for a neatly packaged set of tutorials/tips/tricks/ that will make the complex surfacing modeling process a bit more clearly structured.

What I'm saying is, that it seems the modeling for me involves a lot of trial and error, perhaps more than necessary, so I'd like to iron out the wrinkles that may be in my surfacing skills :o

 

As you say very much comes actual modeling experience. The thing is that I'd need more real-life modeling experience - doing work for actual clients, because then the requirements would be much more specific.

It's way easier to model something that pleases the eye, but manufacturing process is another matter altogether.

 

The real-life modeling chances have been sparse in the past and have stopped altogether lately...

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I hear you... :ermm:

 

Real-life modeling challenges and experiences are always the best, but they don't just hand those out to anyone. How can people learn if they're never given a first change? It's hard to break into something if you haven't done it before.

 

To that end, the best you can do is do a little something on your own, but seriously and from start to finish. If you can show that - doors might open up, because that shows tangible dedication :o

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Guest Carbon
To that end, the best you can do is do a little something on your own, but seriously and from start to finish. If you can show that - doors might open up, because that shows tangible dedication :o

 

I should do that, yes.

In the past I have only made 3D as a part of product design projects.

 

The separate 3D stuff has been more of learning/tutoring specific modeling tools/approaches and rarely detailed work from start to finish.

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If you don't have a client, give yourself a project as if it was from a client. Model what you can as close to real world constraints as you're able to. Don't wait for a client, they won't give you the work if you don't already know how to do it. So make up your own projects, pick something out there that isn't very well designed, redesign and model it as if you were doing it for that company. Good luck!

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Guest Carbon
If you don't have a client, give yourself a project as if it was from a client. Model what you can as close to real world constraints as you're able to. Don't wait for a client, they won't give you the work if you don't already know how to do it. So make up your own projects, pick something out there that isn't very well designed, redesign and model it as if you were doing it for that company. Good luck!

 

 

Thanks!

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Guest Daan

You say you read all of Ed Eatons presentations?

 

Well then, just grab a product and model it, with all details and a smooth surface. Finished? Grab the next. Just modelling real products will give a lot of experience.

 

Daan

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Guest Carbon
You say you read all of Ed Eatons presentations?

 

Well then, just grab a product and model it, with all details and a smooth surface. Finished? Grab the next. Just modelling real products will give a lot of experience.

 

Daan

 

True...

 

I just have to say that I got the "Surfacing Bible" anyway and while most of the information is familiar to me, the value is in the structuring of this information.

Now all this information gathered at other sources, by intuition and experience fits into it's own department in my brain. :D

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