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Best Bang For The Buck Cad - Rhino?

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Are you sure about the using the educational version for commercial work? That flies in the face of every other CAD app out there I know. I would be very surprised if this was allowed. How do commercial seat owners of Rhino feel about educators or students doing commercial work using educational software? That doesn't make me jump around with joy.

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Guest under-dog
Are you sure about the using the educational version for commercial work? That flies in the face of every other CAD app out there I know. I would be very surprised if this was allowed. How do commercial seat owners of Rhino feel about educators or students doing commercial work using educational software? That doesn't make me jump around with joy.

 

 

It appears that you can:

I not sure if you can use it for commercial work but when it comes time to upgrade if you choose, I believe it has to be to "commercial". I recall reading it somewhere though.

 

**Edit**

Looked it up. It appears that you can:

http://www.rhino3d.com/eduproducts.htm

 

I think rhino is used a great percentage by students that are or will transitioning into the work force some day. This is thier way of creating Rhino users. As opposed to the larger software makers that charge a huge cost up front and then a fee every year for the latest and not necissarily greatest version. Year to year the inprovements are minimal and in fact often so cobbled together that they are riddles with bugs and glitches and very few noticable enhancements.

 

I guess that is why this thread is titles "Best bang for the Buck CAD- Rhino". They are an affordable solution. They are the IBM to the others Macs of CAD software. If you notice its import capabilities are far more diversed than that of the likes of software like SW. It works with nurbs, polygonal, native file formats from other MFGs you name it.

 

Just a different approach to marketing and distributing thier product. They would rather make a small amount on a lot of licences than milk a few customers for insane amounts onf money it would appear.

 

From a functionality standpoint it is the same as commercial was my point I origionally I guess. Thier site says "same as commercial"

http://www.rhino3d.com/sales/?Region=NA

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Sure Rhino have a unique approach to marketing and upgrades but the issue here is that as a commercial user in the UK I pay nearly £900 for a seat of Rhino (note that McNeel for all their friendliness have not quite managed to sell the product at the same price worldwide - unlike say Luxology). Sure even at that price it is reasonable but I get a bit "annoyed" having to compete with students and educators doing commercial work on educational software. I know the arguments about students seeding commercial seats etc etc etc but the reality is commercial companies pay top prices to subsidise education. I have no issue with this when it is used for education but when I lose customers to a local university offering cut price commercial work on cut price software, student labour and grants I get annoyed (and I am not alone in this - this is a hot topic in the UK design sector right now).

 

Bear in mind that Rhino is never going to be the only application you need. I use SolidWorks as my primary CAD system and others, so I have invested over £10k in software before I even start to design and make any return. An equivalent educational license (or in some companies - research license) is a fraction of that, so there is far more scope to cost cut on service or offer other incentives - which is exactly what is happening.

 

So no, sorry, Students and educators using educationally priced software should not be able to use it for commercial work. If they want to play the commercial game they need to pay commercial rates like the rest of us.

 

PS I loved your analogy of IBM being the low cost solution and Apple being the premium <_< I used to work for IBM in the 80s and I can assure you at that that time (and since) they are most certainly not the low cost solution. At the time of the original Macs IBM products were more expensive :) These days IBM just wish they could get away with being more expensive!

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Guest funwithapencil

I am new and never have heard of solidworks before. Mostly just knew about products like 3ds max and maya. so I hopped over to thier website to check it out and the cost. then I saw, "email us for a quote on this software". thats pretty clear how expensive it is. so I wont even go there.

 

Rhino 3d looks interesting though.

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Guest Buff

Agree there KQD.

 

I know of an educator using Solidworks on an academic licence to do freelance work outside of the collage.

 

I also know that work from NHS innovations has gone to accademic institutions and they now have so much work coming in, they are outsourcing to freelancers.

 

The same thing goes for the ProE personal eddition, its NOT commercial

 

Also dont forget that 3Dconnexion do a personal eddition space mouse about half price, but it is NOT licenced for comercial work.

 

When I was studying, the educational licenced software would put a watermark over drawings, cross hatching over renderings and you could not import/export files to comercial versions (ProE personal wont export/import)

 

I spoke to one VAR who told me that "cracks" where being leaked out of one of the OEM's main offices, this allegedly being a marketing ploy, as many people use "pirate" software to do "moonlighting" and as such when it comes to specifying a CAD system at their place of employment, they choose the system they use at home and thus it has a positive impact on sales, the caveat being that unless pirate copies where available these moonlighters would not be able to afford the licence and thus sales would suffer.

 

Personally I think the often talked about "pay as you go" CAD would help in this area, i.e. start-ups, moonlighters, students, accademia etc.

 

The price structure could still make an incentive to buy for commercial use and allow students to pay only for what they need, with the previso that files are watermarked/non-transfareable.

 

Back on topic though

 

I use CAD only; for conceptual work and engineering. I find that although it may take longer to generate a concept, often I can reuse the data more easily upstream, thus I get an overall saving on my time.

 

I know it's a stretch on the pocket, but I couldn't honestly recomend anything outside of Pro/E, Solidworks, SoldEdge or maybe Inventor.

 

For surfacing only/concept, Alias is an obvious choice in many ways, but prohibitivley expensive. Rhino fills a nice gap in the market IMO.

 

I can't really comment on the polygon modlers as I've never done any real work with them as they dont offer me what I need for my workflow

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