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Guest csven

"the Children Of Raymond Loewy"

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Guest tikey

I found it funny how you can almost feel the dislike of the author towards Loewy.

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Interesting, I've never heard anyone putting Loewy in the same category as Stark and K-Rash. I suppose that makes sense, but it only shows how much ID have changed over the years.

 

As for the article, "There are two kinds of industrial designers." is right about where I started to get bored.

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Guest Grant Howarth

Interesting piece. The part that grabs my attention is how short product life cycles are becoming. As a result, products are designed to look beautiful for a very short period of time. Only 1 month after buying my mobile phone the metallic coating began to chip exposing ugly cheap plastic only encouraging me to dispose of it (perhaps this is a lifecycle strategy to encourage more sales, however, i change brand every time i buy a phone as i feel no connection to the brand as a result of the product deterioration...

"They are losing their ability to grow old with us. Polycarbonate looks great fresh out of the box, but as soon as it starts to interact with human skin, it begins to blemish. When my cell phone has spent a month or two in my pocket, it looks as if it has developed psoriasis."

 

What really gets to me is that when you buy a product, e.g. a laptop, mobile, etc they have like a peel off clear plastic sheet (can't remember the material!) that "protects" the shinyness. What i have found is that many many people keep these sheets on for months, serving the purpose of what? Keeping the product shiny, because they know, the moment they remove the sheets the product will begin to blemish. Yet, with the sheets on, the product looks ugly.

 

design is again going to be called on to carry out a similar task: to persuade us to buy things we don’t necessarily need.

 

This shinyness is almost a false advertisement. It isn't a promise of high quality, that the product will stay beautiful for years to come, merely a marketing ploy to entice sales.

 

Now, when I bought my Fender Strat 11 years ago it was beautiful, yet the older it gets the more beautiful it becomes. The more you interact with it, the more it becomes a part of you. Despite having chips and scratches in it I feel that it tells a story. It still takes centre place in my room. I wonder, will we ever have a mobile phone that ages the same way? Perhaps with modular technology for ease of upgrade? Mobiles that if you chip will not crumble like cheap veneer but age respectfully?

 

Does anyone else believe emotionally durable design could function as a method to build quality back into brands?

 

After reading that I'm still not sure what type i am!

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Guest tikey
Does anyone else believe emotionally durable design could function as a method to build quality back into brands?

 

It's an interesting idea, but how do you build emotional attachment to a product?

 

And besides, as long as companies rely on planned obsolence as their main market engine (I hope the idea of what I'm saying is understandable, my english is a little rusty). How could one hope to attach the idea of durability to a product?

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Guest JOYRIDE

you guys should check out Donald Normans talk on TED (basically a brief of his excellent book 'emotional design').

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/480

 

I could have sworn that the original concept for the Zune was made of wood. It was purposely supposed to get warn, showing off the gorgeous properties of wood as it ages. I cant find an image or anything, but it was the first time I encountered that thinking. I specifically remember that day in my freshman year of ID, and it baffled me. The thought that it was alright to not only allow, but to showcase flaws and wear in a product was completely different than anything I had heard. After being exposed to more ID, I learned that it was one of thoe coolest ideas and was saddened that it never went anywhere.

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Guest tikey

Well isn't one of Droog's approaches to design taking in account the ageing of the product?

I always though that it's a commendable design philosophy, and I try to follow that point of view in my projects. That's probably one of the reasons I been trying to avoid using plastics.

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Guest Grant Howarth
Does anyone else believe emotionally durable design could function as a method to build quality back into brands?

 

It's an interesting idea, but how do you build emotional attachment to a product?

 

And besides, as long as companies rely on planned obsolence as their main market engine (I hope the idea of what I'm saying is understandable, my english is a little rusty). How could one hope to attach the idea of durability to a product?

 

When designing a product that will be obsolete in months (e.g mobiles etc) its only the technology that needs to become obsolete, not the "chassis". The products form could stay the same, but its life expectancy increased by considering modular design. eg replacing the screen, circuitry etc as clip-in inserts. In some manner instead of reducing repeat sales the brand would effectively guarantee future sales assuming the modularity isnt somehow internationally standardised. For example the user buys a phone with a normal lcd screen.. however, 3 months down the line the company release a touchscreen... instead of scrapping the whole phone the user can simply purchase the touchscreen module... Therefore the company can still rely on planned obsolecence. Just a thought.

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