Jump to content
Product Design Forums

Treasurebox
Sign in to follow this  
Guest njengineer

Building A Workstation For 2d / Solidworks / Photoshop

Recommended Posts

Guest njengineer

Trying to decide on a good workstation for AutoCad drafting / 3D Solidworks, Photoshop and Illustrator. This is what I've decided on so far through research: - Suggestions PLEASE!

 

--Processor - Intel core i7 920 Nehalem 2.66

 

--Mobo - Foxconn Renaissance 1366 Intel x58

 

--Video Card ???? - OpenGL ?? - Not sure on this

 

--Harddrive - ??? Not Sure

 

--4Gb memory

 

--Windows Vista 64 Bit - - - Suggestions on this?

 

-- Corsair 750tx power supply

 

-- DVD/CD drive - Samsung

 

----Thoughts please!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go with the best Quadro video card you can afford.

 

Stick with XP 64 IMO, Vista is burdening the machine with junk you don't need. If you really want Vista you can always dual boot.

 

Go with 6 gigs of ram (triple channel) and if you want to spend some extra money a 10,000 RPM raptor primary HD for your OS and apps and a big 7200 RPM drive for data. I'm not sure about the Foxconn mobos, it's probably fine but if you want to overclock at all I've had much better luck with Asus/Abit/DFI boards.

 

750 watt PSU is overkill probably. I have a 750watt PSU but I also have SLI video cards, 4 HDD's, 2 optical drives, sound card, physx card, overclocked CPU and every USB slot plugged. You could probably get a solid 400-500 watt PSU and save some money on your power bill.

 

All in all should be a real solid machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest CheckMate

Also Windows 7 is out in beta now, is there a 64 bit beta version of that? if so it might be free. I presume what has been suggested so far is good for solid modeling etc and definately fine for photoshop and 2d, but how will it fair doing heavy amounts of fluid analysis and heat transfer analysis, CFD that kind of thing. i tried running some really simple computational fluid dynamics scenarios in solidworks on a really basic machine and i had to leave it running for a couple of days just to get a minute of real time simulation. i think i was using XP, 2.8GHz pent 4, 1GB RAM, MSI motherboard and Nvidia N7600GS graphics card. So what would you need to do some serious CFD analysis? i'm guessing you need a hell of a lot!! so how do you go about building such a computer? What do you need?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also Windows 7 is out in beta now, is there a 64 bit beta version of that? if so it might be free. I presume what has been suggested so far is good for solid modeling etc and definately fine for photoshop and 2d, but how will it fair doing heavy amounts of fluid analysis and heat transfer analysis, CFD that kind of thing. i tried running some really simple computational fluid dynamics scenarios in solidworks on a really basic machine and i had to leave it running for a couple of days just to get a minute of real time simulation. i think i was using XP, 2.8GHz pent 4, 1GB RAM, MSI motherboard and Nvidia N7600GS graphics card. So what would you need to do some serious CFD analysis? i'm guessing you need a hell of a lot!! so how do you go about building such a computer? What do you need?

 

Yes - but do you REALLY want to be running your professional life on a buggy beta operating system? The machine speced would be fine for all of that.

 

You just said yourself you tried running a that on a very basic single core machine with only a gig of ram. The machine listed above is the newest processor built and would be much much faster. The only thing you could do to get any more performance would to get a faster CPU, OR buy the same CPU and invest in a rock solid motherboard/memory combo as well as a high end water cooling solution so you could comfortably overclock it and have it running at full clip day and night.

 

Your other option would be something like a Dual-quad core Mac Pro if you wanted an out of the box solution that was rock solid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest CheckMate

okay, thats fair enough i'd like to see what a state of the art machine could do with that sort of stuff but if you want to do really high powered ray tracing don't you need an even more powerfull machine still? i once read in a newdesign magazine that ping use a cray super computer to run analyses on golf clubs. CFD is just the same as modeling weather patterns but on a smaller scale and they also used cray supercoputers for that too. so what would you do it you wanted to step it up a gear as personally i doubt if even a state of the art desktop machine could deliver the grunt required to do decent CFD. i haven't a clue what the inbetween is between a desktop machine and a supercomputer, i know super computers have many many processors so presumably some people build computers with many many processors for things like CFD and ray tracing. Where do you get a computer like that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest njengineer

Thanks cyberdemon - I've been tossing the XP vs Vista thing around a little. I've had mixed suggestions about Vista, some say its good unless you run any older software, then there's issues. I suppose I'm leaning towards the XP to be on the safe side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
okay, thats fair enough i'd like to see what a state of the art machine could do with that sort of stuff but if you want to do really high powered ray tracing don't you need an even more powerfull machine still? i once read in a newdesign magazine that ping use a cray super computer to run analyses on golf clubs. CFD is just the same as modeling weather patterns but on a smaller scale and they also used cray supercoputers for that too. so what would you do it you wanted to step it up a gear as personally i doubt if even a state of the art desktop machine could deliver the grunt required to do decent CFD. i haven't a clue what the inbetween is between a desktop machine and a supercomputer, i know super computers have many many processors so presumably some people build computers with many many processors for things like CFD and ray tracing. Where do you get a computer like that?

 

If you look around at modern rendering technologies ray-tracing is really a small part of it. Most rendering engines now are based on physical simulations of difuse lighting and a machine like that will comfortably handle most of it. Plenty of people are doing CFD on desktops, or clusters of desktops. Figure even if an 8 core computer is 8 times faster then what you tried doing on your desktop (it'll be faster then that) then your few day simulation translates to a few hours.

 

The term super computer now is used for 1000 machine clusters performing insanely complex scientific calcuations. You can do a high resolution, photorealistic product rendering in Maxwell, Mental Ray, or Vray in a few hours on a good desktop.

 

I have about as much graphics power in my iphone that an SGI workstation would have 15 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest CheckMate
okay, thats fair enough i'd like to see what a state of the art machine could do with that sort of stuff but if you want to do really high powered ray tracing don't you need an even more powerfull machine still? i once read in a newdesign magazine that ping use a cray super computer to run analyses on golf clubs. CFD is just the same as modeling weather patterns but on a smaller scale and they also used cray supercoputers for that too. so what would you do it you wanted to step it up a gear as personally i doubt if even a state of the art desktop machine could deliver the grunt required to do decent CFD. i haven't a clue what the inbetween is between a desktop machine and a supercomputer, i know super computers have many many processors so presumably some people build computers with many many processors for things like CFD and ray tracing. Where do you get a computer like that?

 

If you look around at modern rendering technologies ray-tracing is really a small part of it. Most rendering engines now are based on physical simulations of difuse lighting and a machine like that will comfortably handle most of it. Plenty of people are doing CFD on desktops, or clusters of desktops. Figure even if an 8 core computer is 8 times faster then what you tried doing on your desktop (it'll be faster then that) then your few day simulation translates to a few hours.

 

The term super computer now is used for 1000 machine clusters performing insanely complex scientific calcuations. You can do a high resolution, photorealistic product rendering in Maxwell, Mental Ray, or Vray in a few hours on a good desktop.

 

I have about as much graphics power in my iphone that an SGI workstation would have 15 years ago.

 

 

thanks for that info Cyberdemon i'm definately going to have to find some cash to get myself a better computer so i can do some of this stuff cus i really enjoyed it when i was at uni! get the virtual zippo for your iphone its good for testing the graphics u can blow the flame too whoop whoop!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Phoenix Proto

Definitely look for Open GL. & Like the other poster said go with the best quadro card you can find. Trust me when I say that IT MATTERS! I've replaced way too many video cards & anything less just is inefficient & the software just doesn't render correctly. Go big & fast on the hard drive, your never going to wish it was smaller or slower. & if your putting out the $ might as well do it right & have a good solid machine that can take software updates for yrs to come.

 

Go with XP. I'm not a huge proponent of MS, but XP is stable (enough). Google black viper for tips on turning off all the useless junk that is running by default.

 

All in all those look like some nice spec's. Gotta luv the new PC smell!

 

 

http://www.solidworks.com/sw/videocardtesting.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.