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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Some Of My Sketches

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Guest Austin Brown

haha. maybe the rest of your career as a designer! I'm still on the brink of being able to get it right every time.

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Guest Taro

lol i was watching these tutorial vid of digital drawing, and as soon as that person pulls off the template for ellipses, i turned it off lol.

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Taro - Ya, school's the best time to draw, just sit in the back and look up every few minutes :D, and I'm kinda OKish at drawing ellipses, but can definitely get better, just can't get it consistent and right the first time. Was that tutorial by a actual designer???

 

Austin - What do you mean by draw in a sketchy way? This should keep me busy for a while. Thanks for the advice, time to go draw :P

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Guest Austin Brown

What I meant by drawing in a "sketchy" way was that when you sketch, the first few lines you put down will probably not be final or correct. You need to add more descriptive lines, with expression and direction as you go. You "sketch" or block in your object or idea and then use the pen, pencil, or markers to fill in the details and flesh out the form.

 

It seems like the way that you do it is to think through it and then treat each line that you put down as a final line. This is fine if they're correct, but some of yours are off. If you sketch in your intent lightly, then you can evaluate it and say "that's almost right" and then correct it with a cleaner, darker, more accurate line. This is why sketching is such a big part of the basis for all the other visual arts. Painting, sculpture, design, drawing, web design, graphics, even film. It's because it is too costly to treat every stage, every line as the final one. You need to build up to it, from a sketch - an idea.

 

Get it?

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Some of my older sketches.

 

Something happened when I scanned the first one, that's why it's scratchy.

 

The last three were done at school on the back of homework :). The last one was rushed so the proportions are all off.

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

The first was right after you guys told me to sketch in pen, again proportions are off.

 

Second just some practice.

 

Last one I just focused on the back, which is why there is no front. It's inspired from the Renault Megane Hatch, and the HTC Touch Diamond (a phone). I tried to recreate the sharp edges of the Diamond in the car. How do I make the glass on the car look like glass, and not part of the body?

 

Critiques would be helpful :)

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Advice for improvement: Forget shading for a few years. As others said, do linework. Buy a small triangle and small french curve you can keep with you in your notebook. Instead of chicken scratching, try to get singular lines for your main surfaces. Also, vary the weight of your lines. The lines on the bottom of an object should be thicker, and thinner on the top, but the outside edge should be thicker than any of the lines inside it. If possible the inner lines should all be thinner than either of those... here is an example of some linework I did yesterday, try to emulate this for a bit:

 

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Guest csven

sketchy way = "search lines" ... because the point of ideation sketching isn't to make a pretty drawing, it's to search for a solution. It's why IDers are paid more money than illustrators.

 

Be as scratchy as you wanna be. ID drawings aren't intended to be pieces of art; they're for making products.

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Guest Gringoire

Right... listen to what they have to say... because I'm almost like you... I started posting complicated drawings... I thought like... "Everything I do Must have shadow and contrast"... which proved to be useless (at the level I where was)... Right... today I posted a portrait...( a bit odd for this forum...I know...) in order to name it like... "Hey... this is the last work I put shadows and contrast in"... till I'll get all basics of sketching... right now I'm at chapter: "pen sketching"... & I kinda found out what this thing is about... anyway... In conclusion learn the basics... then the rest... listen and learn from experience... that other guys give you...

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sketchy way = "search lines" ... because the point of ideation sketching isn't to make a pretty drawing, it's to search for a solution. It's why IDers are paid more money than illustrators.

 

Be as scratchy as you wanna be. ID drawings aren't intended to be pieces of art; they're for making products.

 

Disagree 200 billion percent. It's one thing to have multiple curves trying to find the right one, but when a singular curve is really 800 scratchy curves linked together, it looks like crap, and looks really.. childlike, compared to real ID sketching. Part of making products is having decent sketches to get people excited about the product, and given two equally good ideas, the better looking, better presented idea will win.

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Guest csven
sketchy way = "search lines" ... because the point of ideation sketching isn't to make a pretty drawing, it's to search for a solution. It's why IDers are paid more money than illustrators.

 

Be as scratchy as you wanna be. ID drawings aren't intended to be pieces of art; they're for making products.

 

Disagree 200 billion percent. It's one thing to have multiple curves trying to find the right one, but when a singular curve is really 800 scratchy curves linked together, it looks like crap, and looks really.. childlike, compared to real ID sketching. Part of making products is having decent sketches to get people excited about the product, and given two equally good ideas, the better looking, better presented idea will win.

 

I don't see "800 scratchy curves linked together". I see less than ten - and mostly 3 or 4 - for each boundary. They just look worse because 1) he's using pencil, and 2) he's shading with pencil. So if I just look at the linework, it's not all that bad considering his age and level of experience. The more he draws the more fluid he'll become. But to tell him to go out and buy a French curve instead of developing that fluidity is something I wouldn't do.

 

One of the best designers I knew (and one of the early winners of Sony's now defunct prestigious student design competitions) had a "scratchy" technique. Funny thing, none of that translated to the products he put into production.

 

I recall the first time I saw his sketches. Like you I thought they were childlike compared to "real ID sketching". I was arrogant to believe that.

 

He's currently a design director.

 

I don't disagree that quite often product development includes tight renderings to help sell the idea, but that activity is not ideation sketching, which is the core of Industrial Design. It's illustration. There's a difference.

 

If people here want to illustrate, buy templates and use software. If you want to design, learn how think through drawing.

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Guest csven

Here's a "scratchy" sketch of mine from way back. It's the background for one of my portfolio images. I'd venture most professional designers wouldn't have a problem with this.

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Guest Buff

I've gotta agree with csven here.

 

I will likely never post a sketch of my own, it would be way to embarasing, I am utter useless at "Illustration", but I use sketching all the time, and I do mean all the time, so much so, when I got divorced, my ex wife cited it as one of the ireeconcilable differances and made specific mention of opne time we were on a family holiday where pens and paer had been "banned", so i borrowed a pen from a waiter and sketched on a napkin.

 

By sketching I solve problems, like, how parts fit together, how a mechanisum will function, and what approximate form with the product take.

 

If i need a quick hand rendering, then I will trace my sketch and shade with markers, which will give my a bearly adequate illustration to convey an idea to others. If I need apresentation quality hand rendering, then I have staff to do it for me.

 

More often though, for the WOW factor to win business, it's a 3D model, quickley renderd and more importantly a presentation on how much money I can make/save my client

 

So whilst I can't illustrate for toffee, I never the less, earn a modest living as an IDer, and my clients are happy with what I do for them (even though I may not) and I have product that I have helped to take to market, but I have no pretty pictures to show off

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Guest Taro

i dont agree with csven, agree more with cash, no offense to anyone of course, just disgussing.

 

The sketchy style is okay, but it doesnt look nice at all. There are people that can do nice, clean sketches that will take quicker than the sketchy style. Because by the time your done your 3 or 4 lines, they would finish it with a single stroke.

 

I also have a friend, who is the same age as me, uses this kind of sketchy style. And when we both went to portfolio interview, the person recommended him to either take night school, or take other lessons first to improve sketching skills.

 

Unless your an engineer and product designer both at once, otherwise... the final product is not really something that you create, its your idea, but not your art work. Make people appreciate both the art work and the product is really important.

 

In conclusion, if a nice clean sketch can be achieved as quick as a sketchy one, I go for the nice clean ones. If all people need to do is to understand lighting, shadows, and perspectives, wouldn't it be a bit too easy to be a designer? Practicing and improve that sketch is where the effort come from.

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