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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Some Of My Sketches

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Hey I'm 15 and am looking into ID. Would be nice if you guys could give me some feedback on my sketches. Here's one I did from a magazine, but the bottom one I kinda had to made up since there was no picture in the magazine from the back. I'll post more pictures latter. Thanks in advance.

post-27920-1231542297.jpg

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Guest Taro

nice to see another young designer ; )

 

okay, so.. just gonna say what everyone else would probably say to you on this forum:

 

1. leave shading for a bit, concentrate on line work.

2. Pick up a pen, you will improve faster.

3. start from basic, car is a bit hard to start with.

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

When you say line work do you mean perspective and proportions?

The problem with me using a pen is that I tend to have a lot of stray marks. I guess that's only solved with practice.

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haha taro!

 

man u sound like a teacher now :]

 

i love it!

 

taking what u learned and teaching others

 

-------

 

chicken scratch - stray marks = can only be avoided through practice.

 

Draw as much as Taro, and u will improve in no time!

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

Ya I guess there's nothing like practice.

 

Are there any specific kinds of pens I should use?

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Guest Taro

i think most people will use ball point. It has better control, but there may be better ones, I don't know. And if your gonna ask what brand or what type.. probably any type, I think alot of ppl actually use those cheap n simple papermake ballpoint.

 

and haha sketchyd! im just telling them what you, and many other people told me over n over again lol

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Guest AutomóvilVerde
1. leave shading for a bit, concentrate on line work.

What exactly do you mean by line work?

 

I did a quick sketch in pen just to see how it would come out. But it's hard drawing in pen because I can't erase.

Any tips?

post-27920-1231573919.jpg

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Guest MBW17

thats mainly why you want to use pen, to get out of the habit of erasing....keep working, it takes a lot of hard practice!

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Guest Taro

if you have never used a pen b4 for sketching, and u didnt use a ruler or overlay for your pen sketch there. I would consider that you have a good start.

 

fairly straight lines, doesnt have too much shaking.

 

also, i really like how your choose the basic.. a rectangle. I mean, a lot people ( i think myself too b4) choose to start sketching by drawing... cars... cameras etc etc; which I think is a tough start.

 

okay sketchy, im gonna tell him another thing that you told me lol

 

here are some simple exercise that you can do daily to improve fast, sometimes i do one a day, sometimes i do none, sometimes i do 6 or 7. These fundementals, i treat them as warm up, practice, and something to do when Im out of ideas.

 

this exercise is what line work is. What you do is, you draw straight lines, and overlap them 8 times. From short lines to medium to long. Then you draw perfect circles in between them, both small and big. The bottom right is what Austin told me, you draw straight lines and over lap them 8 times, but from dot to dot. This will stop all those... lines that kinda runs off the sketch.

 

you can do the exact same thing with curve lines.

practice013.jpg

 

these are just perspective exercises, but they are extremely helpful. These are not 100% correct, those are the sketches that I started with maybe 3 or 4 months ago. I haven't done them in awhile, and hopefully I've improved on those. o ya, and don't shade the drawings, i did a bad job and shaded my perspective drawings... and they dont make sense lol.

DSC00950.jpg

DSC00956.jpg

 

 

so... good luck

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

It's not the first time I have used pen, I heard about using pen a while ago, tried it, then went back to pencil because it was a lot easier. I did draw complicated things at first, but they turned out decent.

 

I'll start doing those practices in pen, and post some up.

 

Thanks

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

I did some perspective and 3D sketches. I think they're kinda rough.

post-27920-1231706424.jpg

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Guest Austin Brown

You're right green car, these are rough. But the fact that you did them in pen means that we can all look at them and figure out what you're doing right and wrong and tell you how to improve.

 

I think you need to become a little bit more confident in each line. visualize where it will go, what angle it will be, how long it will be. Then do a couple of practice strokes with your arm (don's sketch with your hand by the way. at the very least use your wrist - but the whole forearm is best) until it feels like the line is going to go where you want it to go. Then, just repeat the practice strokes and put the pen to paper. It should feel like golf - practice and practice the same move until you train your muscle to do that move without thinking.

 

It's hard for me to tell whether you've had any formal lessons in perspective, or whether you've just picked it up. If you haven't been formally introduced, please check out some art books and look into it. For example: the robot looks like it was created using at least two different perspectives. The head is much steeper than the "body".

 

One thing you have to keep is your ability to draw lines without looking hairy or sketchy. As far as I can tell, you are drawing from one point to the other. Just do it faster now. Many designers have the terrible habit of drawing a curve or a line in a lot of short strokes. You don't do that but don't start now.

 

Keep practicing on loosening up, learn to do each line right the first time - since you can't erase any more, and develop a really strong understanding of perspective. Oh, and practice whenever you can find the time.

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Guest AutomóvilVerde

My name doesn't sound so good in English, should have taught of that before...

 

Anyway I have taken art at school, if that counts as formal. I know the one, two, and three point perspective. Are there any other things I need to know? Some of the perspective is off my a bit since I'm used to using a ruler. I didn't actually mean to draw the robot at first, that's why the perspective is off.

 

I'm actually used to drawing "hairy" lines, which is why most of the lines are a little squiggly.

 

I also did those practices that Taro told me to do, I could just do those during school.

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Guest Austin Brown

Alright,

 

Thanks for the information. I guess that, since you were taught perspective, most of the issue lies in lack of practice. The perspective seems almost right, and from what you told me, it probably is close enough. My main problem with that page is that the objects that look like long extruded boxes are not square.

 

The whole idea of sketching is that you can set up your idea in a "sketchy" way, and then go back over it when you have it correct. Try making your shapes perfect in two dimensions before you move to three. Recently, someone said that most everything you'll be designing or sketching can be made of a relatively small number of geometric shapes.

 

Here's what I suggest:

 

Start with lines. Draw lines, circles, squares, triangles, lines, lines, lines, curves, lines. Draw it until you hate the fact that you ever asked for help with sketching in the first place. Then, keep going. Eventually your hand will be able to do exactly what you tell it. Right now, it seems like there's a bit of a disconnect or argument between your head and your hand.

 

Once you are a line-drawing machine, move to forms. Extrude those shapes into space. Spheres, cylinders, boxes, prisms, pyramids, bowls, sticks, plates, etc. It should be relatively easy to get through this stage, considering that you understand perspective (but you need to be very self-critical. At the moment, your perspective is off, and you need to be able to notice when it is off and fix it. If you aren't sure, then ask - we're here to help.)

 

When you can draw any form you can think of, start combining them. Spray paint can, wine glass, gear shifter, spaceship, electrical plug, whatever. Build objects from your arsenal of basic forms. Like LEGOs.

 

Again, you have to be very critical of your work. You've learned a lot of the basics, but they seem rusty or halfway there. If you think you're great, and that your perspective is perfect, post it up and get some feedback. You'll probably hear a lot of things you didn't think to look for.

 

At this point, you'll probably need some help with ellipses, which should be saved for another day. Start practicing and keep practicing until you hate design, hate pencils, hate me, whatever. That's the only way to get to the point where sketching feels natural.

 

Good luck and don't stop or you'll have to start it all over again.

 

Austin

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Guest Taro

; ) i do them during boring times at school too lol.

 

high five.

 

 

o ya, reflecting to austin, BE prepare to stuck on circles and spheres and anything that has to do with ellipses for a LONG time.

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