Jump to content
Product Design Forums

Treasurebox
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Buff

Software For Id Business Start-up

Recommended Posts

Guest ron-design

Hey all,

 

I don't post here too often, bit more of a lurker I guess, but this thread caught my eye.

 

I run a small consultancy (i.e. me, myself, and I) and do work in the medical device industry, the eye wear industry, and a few others, while I hold down a full time ID position at a medical device start up.

 

When I set up my company I lined up enough work to keep me going for a while just as you have and it is working out fairly well so far (2+ years in), here is what I am currently running with;

 

Ideation - Tablet PC with Sketchbook Pro

Initial Modeling and Concept Development - Adobe Creative Suite & Rhino

CAD Work - Pro/E Wildfire 4.0

Final Presentation - Hypershot & DesignJet printer

 

This setup has served me quite well, I just setup a new workstation (3 Ghz Intel, FireGL Graphics, 2 Samsung 22" screens, RAID storage, Vista 64, loads of RAM...should be fun building this little workstation up...

 

When it came time for me to purchase a CAD System I got a hold of trials from everywhere, here are my thoughts;

 

SolidEdge - Good start but a bit limiting

 

SolidWorks - Use it at my full time job, works well, hell of a piece of software, however we keep running into too many caveats in the software and find ourselves working around a little too often. Don't take this wrong, I know SolidWorks is big on this site, the whole design world for that matter, just wasn't a good fit for me.

 

NX - great software but $$$, same for Catia

 

Pro/E Wildfire ... - This was my choice and has worked out very well, I made this decision before the whole PTC up for sale thing went down, but I'm not too worried, PTC would go for somewhere around $4 billion, placing it out of the range of any competitors, may go the way of UGS to Siemens, but like I said I'm not too concerned. With Pro/E the upgrade path is wide open, the software is far more complete and well put together than others, after all this is the 20th year of Pro/E. ISDX is really great, however amazing technical surfacing can be performed in the base package as well. Let me know if you would like some more detail.

 

Hypershot has really worked well, the result vs. the amount of time put in is staggering compared to others, I wouldn't recommend anything else, as long as you use it within its field of use, meaning expecting incredible photorealistic renders with 10 min of input is not reasonable, but for creating presentation materials it cannot be beat.

 

Well those are my thoughts for now...

 

Good luck...

 

R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading through the recent posts, I think you are pretty well sorted anyway. My only comment would be do not build the system around what you think your employee will need. Build it around what you are happy with. If your business grows as fast as you are planning the cost of software will be insignificant compared to your staffing costs - especially if you get it on lease (and why wouldn't you? - there are loads of deals around right now). If you find the right person and they are really comfortable with Pro/E then buy Pro/E for them. Having a single system in a design environment can restrict creativity rather than foster it.

 

Having said that it sound like you are UK based, so you are paying through the nose for your software. There are more SolidWorks users here than anywhere - most of the colleges use it, most ID students now come out knowing it. Training is a BIG cost and a HUGE generator of downtime. Don't underestimate the time it takes a person to relearn a system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Buff

Thanks for all the help and advice guys.

 

In the end I've gone for SolidEdge.

 

I'm also adding Teamcentre Express for PDM as document and data management will become an important part of my business.

 

I suppose this isn't the obvious choice over something like say, Solidworks, but I run various benchmarks on surfacing, solid modeling, drafting, rendering, assembly etc, etc and on the whole for my particular needs, I felt this was the right choice

 

I've started a blog, to monitor how the implementation goes, and hopefully get some feedback from others on how they are finding working SolidEdge

 

http://the-buff-edge.blogspot.com/

 

By chosing this, I think I can do without Rihno and Hypershot, and for sketching I'll probably use Sketchbook Pro and a Cintiq.

 

I'm also installing a server and another workstation to manage the data over a vpn.

 

I'll keep you posted on how it goes via the blog and here too if anyone is interested

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be interesting to follow this. I'm just curious about one of the bullets on your blog - "best in class surface modelling"?

Maybe you can expand on this a bit? I'm not aware that SolidEdge has a lot of the tools that, say, SolidWorks has, or Pro/E come to that. Specifically things like G2 boundary surfaces, G2 fill surfaces, G2 variational sweep (Pro/E)? Did they add lots of new stuff in the most recent update?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Buff

OK, just to be completely fair about the surfacing thing, that statement is made on the basis that the solidworks tech guy couldn't produce the benchmark model i set him, even after half a day of various attempts to get it right. His best was G2 mainly, but had some areas of G1 where I was looking for G2

 

The SE guy did it straight away with G2 surface over all the details I was looking for.

 

The Pro/E guy said "Solid Edge has better surfacing capability than Solidworks (his opinon based on his experiance selling Solidworks previously in the past) and is a good as the standard toolset in Wildfire 5.0, but not as good as ISDX)

 

In the end, my decision wasnt based soley on my needs for a good surfacing toolset.

 

One should also add, that some or even all of the demonstrated capability could be down to the experiance and training of ther individuals concerned.

 

"Best in class", is my opinion based on what I've seen for the price I'm paying

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jollyroger

It is great that you decided to test different tools before you buy. I used to work for a UGS reseller and I can say that direct comparison was what our SolidWorks competitors feared mostly. Their sales and marketing were better than ours but we won 80% percent of the deals in which technical considerations, integration, scalability (especially), etc. were considered thoroughly. Teamcenter blows away their "PDM", a bit silly to say PDM. :)

So, congratulations on the good choice and wish your business success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest csven
The Pro/E guy said "Solid Edge has better surfacing capability than Solidworks (his opinon based on his experiance selling Solidworks previously in the past) and is a good as the standard toolset in Wildfire 5.0, but not as good as ISDX)
This is interesting to me. Had no idea SE's surfacing was any good. Now that I'm pretty well connected to SE's development managers, I'll need to quiz them. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Buff
The Pro/E guy said "Solid Edge has better surfacing capability than Solidworks (his opinon based on his experiance selling Solidworks previously in the past) and is a good as the standard toolset in Wildfire 5.0, but not as good as ISDX)
This is interesting to me. Had no idea SE's surfacing was any good. Now that I'm pretty well connected to SE's development managers, I'll need to quiz them. Thanks.

 

 

In the benchmark I set, Inventor (my current modeling tool) just won't do it no way no how. I have to cheat and allow the geomeery be technically incorrect.

 

SW fell over a few times, and ended up taking the same approach as Inventor, still worked better than Inventor though. even some of the Standard demmo's fell over (filets jumps to mind mostly)

 

Pro/E did the job fine (non ISDX) only demo'ed one approach. seem robust, but offered perhaps less freedom?

 

SE did the job 3 differant ways, all quick and easy, no fuss and the geometery was accuratley defined

 

All of this of course is still quite subjective, it was only one benchmark and it's difficult to gauge sometimes the independance of software/operator skill without going into a seriously indepth statistical study. for that would need several CAD jockeys using each of the packages. A sort of Gauge R&R type study I suppose.

 

Only buying a few seats (3) it's a bit much to ask for such a study, but it does appear to be a good time to buy. These guys are clambering all over each other to get such a small amount of business

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest csven

I'm curious to see an image of the shape/part you used for testing. Can you post one here? Or maybe start a new thread showing your comparison process. Would be instructive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Buff
I'm curious to see an image of the shape/part you used for testing. Can you post one here? Or maybe start a new thread showing your comparison process. Would be instructive.

 

 

I dont actually have a model, as Inventor (or me) can deliver it. I could show a composte set of features.

 

It wil be a week or two in the making as Im working on a large (well, large for me) tender.

 

I have subcontacted the surfacing out in the meantime, so when that comes back, I could post that.

 

It realy isnt all that complex per se, but ther are conflicting features, so the work around is technicallly incorect form

 

I could scketch it, but I think it would be better if I got my 7 week old son to scribble it than me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Buff
One of SolidEdge's developers provide me this link: http://manufacturing.cadalyst.com/manufact...l.jsp?id=101540

 

This is pretty dated, so I'd be interested in something newer.

 

 

they still use that portable stereo model as a bluedot/bluesurf example. It doesnt do it real justice IMO

 

I'm not sure what if any improvements have been made to the surfacing tools since v14 to V20 --> ST

 

For sure NX surfacing, in articular the add on package is very good (not so sure its Catia good). I know guys who have been using since NX2, now running NX4 and evaluating NX6. They tell me its really good for what they do (mostly turbine parts)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JelleT
One of SolidEdge's developers provide me this link: http://manufacturing.cadalyst.com/manufact...l.jsp?id=101540

 

This is pretty dated, so I'd be interested in something newer.

 

 

they still use that portable stereo model as a bluedot/bluesurf example. It doesnt do it real justice IMO

 

I'm not sure what if any improvements have been made to the surfacing tools since v14 to V20 --> ST

 

For sure NX surfacing, in articular the add on package is very good (not so sure its Catia good). I know guys who have been using since NX2, now running NX4 and evaluating NX6. They tell me its really good for what they do (mostly turbine parts)

I'm using both NX and CATIA, had my NX course in NX4 now using NX3 (freeform).

 

NX is definitely not as good as CATIA although it seems they improved a lot since NX5

 

Anyway, both have pro's and con's in workflow..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest csven
NX is definitely not as good as CATIA although it seems they improved a lot since NX5
I've been wondering about this and am hoping you can provide some specifics. Neither is currently an option for me, but someday I may make the jump to one of them. Thanks in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.