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Cyberdemon

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  1. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from shyamal in My Car Design Sketches   
    All I have to say is if you're still in high school you're already putting people to shame. Those are great sketches with great perspectives.
  2. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from OpellaGypewag in Looking To Get Into Industrial Design   
    Visit www.idsa.org for a list of schools.
     
    Florida doesn't have much to offer (The Fort Lauderdale program is still very young) but consider schools like SCAD, Georgia Tech and Auburn. All are within a reasonable driving distance and have very solid programs. If you want to venture further there are plenty of other schools worthy of consideration.
     
    Transferring credits isn't always a great idea. The main reason being the foundation of design typically involves taking studio courses which are very intensive and you usually can't take more than 1 per semester. Because of this, even if you took all of your liberal arts classes at a community college, while you could transfer credits it wouldn't necessarily cost less or save you time, because you'll still need to spend 4 years to get your degree. I would speak with your guidance counsellor or give the admissions offices at some schools a call to find out what your best option would be.
     
    If you think affording it is a problem, then there are always loans (or joining the military and using the GI bill to pay for school). I went to Virginia Tech specifically because the tuition price was nearly half of that at most private schools.
  3. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from OpellaGypewag in Looking To Get Into Industrial Design   
    Visit www.idsa.org for a list of schools.
     
    Florida doesn't have much to offer (The Fort Lauderdale program is still very young) but consider schools like SCAD, Georgia Tech and Auburn. All are within a reasonable driving distance and have very solid programs. If you want to venture further there are plenty of other schools worthy of consideration.
     
    Transferring credits isn't always a great idea. The main reason being the foundation of design typically involves taking studio courses which are very intensive and you usually can't take more than 1 per semester. Because of this, even if you took all of your liberal arts classes at a community college, while you could transfer credits it wouldn't necessarily cost less or save you time, because you'll still need to spend 4 years to get your degree. I would speak with your guidance counsellor or give the admissions offices at some schools a call to find out what your best option would be.
     
    If you think affording it is a problem, then there are always loans (or joining the military and using the GI bill to pay for school). I went to Virginia Tech specifically because the tuition price was nearly half of that at most private schools.
  4. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from OpellaGypewag in Do Girls Do Product Design?   
    There are definately women in design, but it is certainly the minority.
     
    The reality is that design is a highly competitive field, and that you need to both want to be a designer and fight to be a designer. In my experience the majority of the female students I went to school with didn't have that drive and many dropped design entirely, or moved to related fields like graphics or new media. With that said there were also several who were hard working, competitive, and landed good jobs in the product design world.
     
    The only one who can answer that question is you. If design isn't something that motivates you, then it will be hard to keep the drive needed to be successful.
  5. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from MGPL in Plastic Enclosure Design - Choosing A Texture   
    Textures are standardized because there are typically only a few places that do texturing, though there are several different processes. Mold-Tech is typically the global standard and they have the 11000 series of textures which is fairly common, but they have a whole range from very faint to very coarse. These textures are applied after the tooling is cut, typically by an acid etching process.
     
    There are also a series of VDI textures which are actually done by modifying the EDM which is used to cut your tool, but those textures have some unique complexity which may or may not make them appropriate for use. (If a modification needs to be done after your initial tool is cut, the texture will not match properly).
     
    I would speak to your tooling vendor, ask them to find out who their preferred texture vendor is, and see if they can provide you with sample plaques (these are standard, but sometimes hard to get a hold of). But if you are in China, it may be as easy as taking a trip to the factory that will do the tooling.
  6. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Modify Gforce Laptop To Quadro For 3D Cad   
    Keep in mind soft modding was primarily around desktop cards - so it doesn't help if you're trying to use it on a laptop.
     
    A modern Geforce card is plenty capable for most applications. And if you need the dedicated workstation support you're stuck forking over the cash for a workstation. If you want to be more budget minded look for a refurbished Dell machine on their outlet site.
  7. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from streamliner in Portfolio - Where Am I Going Wrong?   
    If you want as critical as possible I'd highly recommend looking at the portfolios of other recent grads throughout the world on sites like Coroflot and Core77.
     
    -Your projects are very furniture focused. A lot of the details are very mechanical in nature which might be applicable for certain companies, but in terms of where contemporary furniture is, those designs aren't very relevant and that's really all you're showing.
     
    -Your dirtbike is nicely considered mechanically, but again - not a lot of industrial design or styling. It's good you understand the mechanics - but it seems like your portfolio is more focused on the engineering and less focused on the design.
     
    -If your course was 4 years, it does not come off as 4 years worth of work. There's no real show of sketching to resolve ideas, research, human factors, rendering, etc. The stuff in your misc products section come off as craft projects, not design work. I would not put things like a shelf that you built in your portfolio.
     
    If you are having trouble getting a job I would look into how can you really revamp or update the projects, and frankly I would do several new interdependent projects that show creative thinking, work heavily on your sketching and show that you can create 100 ideas around 1 concept, improve your rendering and 3D techniques, etc.
     
    Remember - graduating with honors just means you fulfilled your course requirements with exception, but it does not mean that you will be at the same level of other graduates. You need to broaden your scope and see what people are doing. I'll be honest that for the work you've shown in your portfolio, I would have expected that out of most students coming out of their 2nd year of design school. Your portfolio shows me you can develop a single concept, but no indication of why that concept was the best one or the dozens you threw out because they weren't good enough.
     
    Hopefully this is helpful. Cheers.
  8. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Serious Portfolio Review Needed - Hit Hard.   
    Rob,
     
    Overall your portfolio materials and presentation iare actually pretty good, but in my opinion you've made a glaring omission on the ideation side. There isn't enough sketching, or enough materials that tell a story of "I had 20 ideas, and here is how I filtered them down to the final solution and why it is best". That may be stuff you have in your full portfolio, but I'd recommend putting at least 1 or 2 more of your best samplings on there of your sketching. If it doesn't really exist or the sketchings are too quick and dirty, consider revising or redrawing them to at least tell that story.
     
    I get that you can pump some CAD, put out some renderings, but what I'd really want to see is "this was the complex problem, and this is how I got there" and tell me that story in a visual way (sketching, concept models, etc).
     
    Understanding your process is key. You've shown a little bit of process but mostly it's only a quick snapshot of different elements and not the complete story. You don't need to tell that story for every project, but pick your deepest project (preferably not the exhibit or POP stuff as I find that those stories tend to be more about aesthetics only) and go deep into your process.
     
    On the shampoo bottle for example, you show some nice bottle sketches but it's a very broad sample and then bam - final solution. It would be nice to know if that concept was just picked at random, or by a client, or show how you evolved it.
     
    Now if that stuff is in your full portfolio and you've presented it, I'd think about how you're interviewing and selling yourself. Show yourself off in the best light possible and how you've brought those thought processes to your work.
     
    Overall nice work and a good, clean site layout though. Keep at it.
  9. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Can I Put "all Rights Reserved" ?   
    This would mean absolutely nothing. If you are trying to say you are "protecting" your idea, then the laws on how to do this exist differently in every country.
     
    In reality, no one is out to steal your ideas - and there's a good chance that something that may be a new idea to you was actually thought up and documented elsewhere.
  10. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from streamliner in Portfolio - Where Am I Going Wrong?   
    If you want as critical as possible I'd highly recommend looking at the portfolios of other recent grads throughout the world on sites like Coroflot and Core77.
     
    -Your projects are very furniture focused. A lot of the details are very mechanical in nature which might be applicable for certain companies, but in terms of where contemporary furniture is, those designs aren't very relevant and that's really all you're showing.
     
    -Your dirtbike is nicely considered mechanically, but again - not a lot of industrial design or styling. It's good you understand the mechanics - but it seems like your portfolio is more focused on the engineering and less focused on the design.
     
    -If your course was 4 years, it does not come off as 4 years worth of work. There's no real show of sketching to resolve ideas, research, human factors, rendering, etc. The stuff in your misc products section come off as craft projects, not design work. I would not put things like a shelf that you built in your portfolio.
     
    If you are having trouble getting a job I would look into how can you really revamp or update the projects, and frankly I would do several new interdependent projects that show creative thinking, work heavily on your sketching and show that you can create 100 ideas around 1 concept, improve your rendering and 3D techniques, etc.
     
    Remember - graduating with honors just means you fulfilled your course requirements with exception, but it does not mean that you will be at the same level of other graduates. You need to broaden your scope and see what people are doing. I'll be honest that for the work you've shown in your portfolio, I would have expected that out of most students coming out of their 2nd year of design school. Your portfolio shows me you can develop a single concept, but no indication of why that concept was the best one or the dozens you threw out because they weren't good enough.
     
    Hopefully this is helpful. Cheers.
  11. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Thesis Project | Plus One Auto   
    The core concept is not much different from a Smart car other than aesthetically/drivetrain and the proposed packaging (I don't realistically think you have the space required for a small 2+2)
     
    I think the smart car concept (car that was small enough to park perpendicular to the curb or 2 in 1 spot) was all very clever but never quite widely adopted as it needed to be. Plus the parking 2 cars in 1 spot only works if the person stuck in the back doesn't need to leave till after you. It works great for a rendering, and maybe as a fleet vehicle, but that aspect would be impossible to control in real environments.
     
    Even in urban environments, most people aren't willing to give up the practicality afforded by a larger car.
     
    The problem with congestion in cities is also the fact that most people in cities use their cars ONLY for going out of the city. Which means the small car needs to be effective on the highways and on longer trips.
     
    As a pure vehicle design exercise - I think the design itself could have used a lot of refinement. Theres no real surfacing or flow, just a base shape with additional shapes booleaned on and vents cut out. It would have been nice to see your sketch progression to understand why you chose the forms you did.
  12. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Kula (Sphere) Chair   
    Well you rendered what looks like a solid metal object, doesn't read as plastic if that was your intent. You can make plastic glossy or vacuum metallized, but that would be an interesting process on plastic that large. Also doesn't look like a shape that would want to be made out of plastic - very large, lots of undercuts and pulls from different directions, etc. Materials inform design, and this seems that it was not looking at any particular way of being created which is what separates the artists from designers.
     
    Concepts read how they are presented - so presenting with a very finished rendering style makes it look like "here it is, I'm done" and putting it out of context makes it even more dramatic.
     
    If you were doing a sketch, would you glue your sketch on top of a full color ad? Generally not, because if you're purely trying to communicate the design of your object it would detract. The faux floor mirror and desert are doing that here.
     
    If you are looking for improvements on the form and design consider presenting work either using a flat simple shader (basic ambient occlusion only is very useful here):
     
    Not to jump at you for it, the design itself has plenty of directions it could evolve but it reads right now as a very quick concept that was polished too fast for "blings" sake and not designs sake.
  13. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Kula (Sphere) Chair   
    You rendered a chair - but the inner seat portion of it is showing up basically as solid black.
     
    Also, is this chair machined from a 6 ton block of aluminum and then polished by hand?
     
    In design, you want to show things in context...the "automotive stuck in the middle of a desert" scene isn't a very good use of context for a chair.
     
    Also you show the chair being some type of polished metal, but their is a razor sharp edge where the inner piece (material unknown) meets the outer sphere and that part would be the arm rest.
     
    It comes off as just a couple quick booleans to a shape without any consideration for how it could be made or how it would actually work as a chair. These days it's very easy to do a shiny rendering like that in a few minutes - you need to put more thought into the design if you want to sell it.
  14. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Which Software Will Be Suitable?   
    You've described several software solutions, but not one. What you are really looking for is an engineering package. Some elements of what you listed however are not really software issues, they are design issues. For example - I do not know of any software that will tell you your design is water tight. Even if it does, there is no guarantee that a real world manufactured part would be water tight. Most water tight designs require specially engineered seals which operate on compression or some other method. You can design the parts in 3D but until the physical part is made, you will usually have interference in your digital part.
     
    As far as the optical engineering goes, there are also specialized tools for that, but I do not know of any off hand.
     
    All of the software you've mentioned is in general very expensive, because they are professional tools. Some may offer student licenses, but they will more than likely not have all the features you mentioned.
     
    You may be better off contacting a software reseller who deals in Pro Engineer or Solidworks. They could probably assist you better.
  15. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in How Can Consumer Products Be So Inexpensive?   
    If you're interested in this it may be worth taking a business class at a local college.
     
    In general the process goes like this.
     
    At the beginning of any project, whether it is a laptop computer, or a trash can the business case needs to be looked at carefully and understood.
     
    If I'm making a widget I need to know:
     
    -How much will the NRE (Non-Recurring Engineering/Expenses) be? NRE includes the money I have to pay all my engineers and manufacturer for research, development, and tooling costs associated with a project. NRE is money that includes all of your big costs up front to get the product to market, and is the reason most designers come on these boards with a "Brilliant" idea that never goes anywhere, because they don't have the capital to pay for all the NRE. This usually gets all laid out by a business team or program manager.
     
    -How many widgets can I sell in a year? To what markets? How will I get products from my warehouse onto store shelves, or websites, or TV commercials. This is typically the responsibility of a marketing person. They dictate the business case and say "it will cost us $1 million dollars to make our widget, but we can sell 500k a year and make $5 profit on each one".
     
    Generally there is also the idea of margins - which dicate how much profit you want to make on a product. Certain products may have higher or lower margins depending on the space.
     
    For example - if you sell low run, highly proprietary bike parts you can probably charge very high margins. You know you will sell fewer of them, so you need to make more money on each one to pay for your business. As long as this price will be supported by the market, you may be able to sell something that cost $100 to make for $500.
     
    Some products have very low margins. If I am selling paper plates I can't expect to sell them for 5 times what it costs to make them. I may have to sell a $1 plate for $1.50, but I know I'll sell millions so the profit will be realized and I can still be competitive.
     
    There are business models that are even more complex these days.
     
    For example - it may cost Apple almost as much to sell an Ipad as it does to make them. But - they can afford to do this because the Ipad is only a gateway to other services. Now for every iPad sold, Apple may realize an extra $200/year in music downloads, app sales, etc.
     
    Oh yeah...I knew I had answered this question before...haha
     
    http://boards.core77.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=23478&p=166188#p166188
  16. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Why Is The Forum So Slow?   
    Great news...is there any way of automating this so that it automatically pairs up anyone's old account with the new account assuming they haven't changed screen names?
  17. Downvote
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Why Is The Forum So Slow?   
    Losing the accounts sucked, but that really isn't the end of the world. I've been on several forums where they've lost the complete database (all original posts) when transferring things over. So when you say "nothing was saved" - everything except your accounts was salvaged. All of the posts, all of the attachments, etc. It stinks to see "guest_cash68" in front of your old content but it's all still there.
     
    It sucks, but accidents happen and the reality is it comes down to a bad situation with a web host who wasn't properly backing up data. Had nothing to do with transferring over the site data, the site data transferred over fine but the member DB was lost after that.
     
    Forums aren't mutually exclusive, if you like Core77 then post there too. But the only way the forum will not be slow is by people contributing. So if you don't contribute because people aren't contributing then it's just a self fulfilling prophecy I'm afraid.
  18. Like
    Cyberdemon got a reaction from admin in Teaching & Learning Of Cad 3D Modelling Packages   
    In terms of learning 3D Software, the best way I've seen it done is a method a professor of mine used after I had already graduated. I didn't experience it firsthand, but discussing the methodologies and seeing the results made me feel it was much more effective than typical approaches.
     
    The approach used was very analogous to learning how to sketch.
     
    When learning to sketch, the best way is to start learning very simple objects (curves, planes, primitives, etc) - so this method was applied to the teaching of 3D software. Whereas typical 3D software teaches via tutorials which cover a large range of tools at once, this method would only step through and apply to very limited sets of tools at once. By starting with simple objects and repeating the steps it allows for quicker learning and absorption of skills and tools rather than following instructions to get to a desired result with the hope that those applications will be understood by the student. In this case, Modo was the 3D package used because the nature of sculpting polygons is more analogous to something students understand rather than surfaces and solids.
     
    Once those basics are understood than more advanced concepts like sculpting and manipulation can occur. From there the student has a basis around several tools on how to create 3D objects and can begin learning to understand the 3D form much better.
     
    At the end of that first class/semester class students would build something and export it to a 3D printer and there were some very impressive results. A lot of very complex objects and surfaces which would never be achieved by a first time student using a traditional CAD package. (Motorcycle fairings, other very organic shapes which even Class A surfacers would have a tough time with).
     
    After that the jump to more traditional CAD tools like Solidworks or Alias are more easily understood because the students have a better understanding of how to arrive at certain forms. That happens in a second class/semester.
     
    I am also a big believer that in order for students to effectively use CAD, it helps to have a solid understanding of some of the math behind things - especially when talking about surfacing. Explaining the differences between tangency and curvature continuity are complex, but can be easily visualized with real world product examples. Same goes for understanding the differences and applications between different curve degrees, etc.
     
    As a professional, 3D modelling is essential and is all handled in Alias. Freeform surface exploration can be quickly prototyped and felt in the hand. Once a real prototype is evaluated, the 3D Data can be modified and refined and is always directly related to the physical samples. Compare this to sculpting in foam or clay - you may wind up with a fantastic foam model, but the translation to 3D is never as refined or accurate as you would expect, even if working from 3D scan data.
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